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Course Offerings

SCIENCE COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


Physical Science 


An introductory course designed to allow students to explore the basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Students will explore the nature of these sciences through the application of the science and engineering practices. 


*standard and honors available


Biology


Biology is the study of life. This course will help us all to better appreciate the creatures around us, understand the marvels of the human body, and realize the magnificent processes of life. This informed position will also provide a platform for decision-making that reflects a protection and stewardship of our natural environment.


*standard and honors available


Oceanography


Oceanography covers a wide range of topics. Half the class will be more oceanography topics such as physical and chemical properties of the ocean such as ocean circulation, tsunamis, plate tectonics and the geology of the seafloor.  The other half of the class is more marine biology including marine organisms and ecosystems.



Chemistry I


This course is an introduction to the basic principles of Chemistry. The course includes a study of measurement skills, atomic structure, and the periodic table, bonding, stoichiometry, solutions, acids, bases, and simple chemical and nuclear reactions. These topics are also studied under experimental conditions and in problem-solving situations. The course includes laboratory experiments designed to reinforce course content. It aligns with the Tennessee State Science Standards.


*standard and honors available



Environmental Science Honors

The study of organic cycles, and patterns in the natural world and how they are affected by human activities. This class will examine the impact humans have on the environment and the sustainability of the human population at the current rate of interference with natural resources.


Principles of Physics 

Principles of Physics helps students recognize the nature and scope of physics and its relationship to the other sciences. Students will learn about basic topics such as motion, forces, energy, momentum, waves,  and electricity. Students will be engaged in scientific inquiry, investigations and labs so that they develop a conceptual understanding and basic scientific skills.   This class is mostly project based and hands-on. 

  

Physics Honors

Physics Honors covers a broad range of topics in physics including kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, waves, simple harmonic motion, optics, electric fields and electric circuits. Laboratory experiences are used to introduce and reinforce basic physics concepts, centering on engineering projects and application of physics formulas and concepts to real-world examples. There is an emphasis on mathematical rigor.

  

Aquatic Biology

Aquatic Biology course is interdisciplinary and is designed to be a rigorous science course that stresses scientific principle, analysis, and includes a laboratory/field investigation component. The goal of the Aquatic Biology course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both man-made and natural, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them.   The class includes a research project that is completed over the course of the semester.

 

Genetics

This course is an in depth exploration of the field of genetics. It will build on and go beyond Biology I.  Foundational topics such as cell components and processes, protein synthesis, mutations, and basic heredity and genetics principles will be reviewed before moving on to more advanced studies in the course. The chemical structure of genetic material, mendelian inheritance, and gene combination will be studied. Models of gene expression and regulation will be explored and simulated. Students will explore current advances in genetics and biotechnology through provided texts, scientific literature, lab exercises, and other resources. Ethical, social, and environmental implications of genetic technologies and their roles in society will be evaluated during the course.


Human Anatomy and Physiology Honors


Anatomy and physiology is a course that involves the structure and function of the human body, as it pertains to how the body systems relate to one another in organization, adaptation, and homeostasis.  This course will involve laboratory activities, projects, dissections, textbook material, models, diagrams, journal writings, and clinical studies.  The material learned in this course can be applied to medical field careers, health and fitness careers, and biological research careers.


AP Chemistry


The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore content such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium.

 

Pre-requisite: Chemistry Honors

Math Department Course Descriptions

REQUIREMENTS

All students are required to complete four credits in mathematics. Students must earn credit in Math I, Math II, and Math III, and another mathematics course beyond Math III. Students must be enrolled in a mathematics course each school year. The Bridge Math course is designed for students who have not scored 19 or higher on the ACT by the beginning of the senior year. TNReady End of Course assessments will e given in Math I, Math II, and Math III. These examinations will be factored into the student’s semester average at a percentage determined by the State and Bradley County Board of Education. 

REQUIREMENTS PERTAINING TO THE INCOMING FRESHMEN 

Students are placed in mathematics courses which best fit their needs based on the chosen path and past performances in mathematics. All students will be placed in Math I their freshman year, which is a year-long course, unless he or she has been a part of an accelerated program and meets the requirements to enter in Math IB.

INTGERGRATED MATH CURRICULUM

The Integrated Math program is an alternate approach to achieve mathematical understanding. The content provides the foundation for future work in mathematics and science. An understanding of integrated mathematics is essential in preparation for careers that utilize or depend upon mathematics. It provides students with tools to represent and solve problems in a variety of ways. Students will better understand the language and abstract symbols of mathematics and how to use that language in real life application. 

INFORMATION FOR CALCULATORS

Calculators are deemed handheld technology and will be necessary for student use in the appropriate courses. Since students will need to use these calculators on college entrance examinations, students are encouraged to purchase their own graphing calculators during high school. This will enable students to utilize these calculators for homework, projects and to become familiar with their own calculator. Currently, the TI-84 calculators are the models used in all Walker Valley High School mathematics courses. There are other brands available, but parents should make sure that the other brand offers the same features.


MATH IA & B

 

Credit(s): 2

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 9

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

Articulation Available? No

Prerequisite(s): None

Course Description:  Math I students should become fluent in solving characteristic problems involving the analytic geometry of lines, such as finding the equation of a line given a point and a slope. This fluency can support students in solving less routine mathematical problems involving linearity, as well as in modeling linear phenomena (including modeling using systems of linear inequalities in two variables).

     Math I students should become fluent in using geometric transformation to represent the relationships among geometric objects. This fluency provides a powerful tool for visualizing relationships, as well as a foundation for exploring ideas both within geometry (e.g., symmetry) and outside of geometry (e.g., transformations of graphs).

     Students will be required to take a TNReady End of Course assessment which will be factored into the student’s semester average. This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator. After successful completion of this course, students will take Math II.   Block (2 semesters).

MATH I A & B HONORS

 

Credit(s): 2

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 9

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

Articulation Available? No 

Prerequisite(s):

 Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • i-Ready score (winter diagnostic) >540  or >80 percentile
  • 8th grade math grade >B
  • 7th grade TNReady score OnTrack (3) or Mastered (4)
  • Teacher recommendation 

Course Description: Math I Honors covers the same standards as Math I. Students must meet the State of Tennessee requirements to receive the honors credit. Topics are covered more in-depth and as time permits additional topics are introduced for enrichment. This course is designed for the highly motivated student who plans to purse higher-level mathematics courses.


Students will be required to take a TNReady End of Course assessment which will be factored into the student’s semester average. This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator.  After successful completion of this course, students will take Math II. Block (2 semesters).

MATH II

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 10

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00 

Articulation Available? No 

Prerequisite(s): Completed Math I Credit

Course Description: Math II students will gain fluency in graphing functions (including linear, quadratic, and exponential) and interpreting key features of the graphs in terms of their function rules and a table of value, as well as recognizing a relationship (including a relationship within a data set). This forms a critical base for seeing the value and purpose of mathematics, as well as for further study in mathematics.

Students will also become fluent in adding, subtracting, and multiplying polynomials which supports them throughout their work in algebra, as well as in their symbolic work with functions. Manipulation can be more mindful when it is fluent.

Fluency with the triangle congruence and similarity criteria will help students throughout their investigations of triangles, quadrilaterals, circles, parallelism, and trigonometric ratios. These criteria are necessary tools in geometric modeling.

Students will be required to take a TNReady End of Course assessment which will be factored into the student’s semester average. This course will use of the TI-84 calculator. After successful completion of this course, students will take Math III. Block.

MATH II HONORS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 9-10

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00 

Articulation Available? No

Prerequisite(s): 

Students with 2 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score OnTrack (3) or Mastered (4) (most recent available used in determination)
  • Math 1 grade >B
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: Math II honors covers the same standards as Math II. Students must meet the State of Tennessee requirements to receive the honors credit. Topics are covered more in-depth and as time permits additional topics are introduced for enrichment. This course is designed for the highly motivated student who plans to pursue higher-level mathematics courses.

Students will be required to take a TNReady End of Course assessment which will be factored into the student’s semester average. This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator. After successful completion of this course, students will take Math III. Block.

MATH III

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 11

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00 

Articulation Available? No

Prerequisite(s): Completed Credits in Math I & II

Course Description: Math III will guide students to look at algebraic manipulation as a meaningful enterprise, in which they seek to understand the structure of an expression or equation and use properties to transform it into forms that provide useful information (e.g., features of a function or solutions to an equation). This perspective will help students continue to usefully apply their mathematical knowledge in a range of situations, whether their continued study leads them toward college or career readiness.

Seeing mathematics as a tool to model real-world situations will be an underlying perspective in everything students do, including writing algebraic expressions, creating functions, creating geometric models, and understanding statistical relationships. This perspective will help students appreciate the importance of mathematics as they continue their study of it.

In particular, students will be taught to recognize that much of mathematics is concerned with understanding quantities and their relationships. They will be able to pick appropriate units for quantities being modeled, using them as a guide to understand a situation, and be attentive to the level of accuracy that is reported in a solution.

Math III students will understand the effects of parameter changes and be able to apply them to create a rule modeling the function.

Students will be required to take a TNReady End of Course assessment which will be factored into the student’s semester average. This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator. After successful completion of this course, students will take a senior level math*. Block.

*See 12 grade math options and Prerequisites

MATH III HONORS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 10-11

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

Articulation Available? No

Prerequisite(s): 

Students with 2 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score OnTrack (3) or Mastered (4) (most recent available used in determination)
  • Math 2 grade >B
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: Math III Honors covers the same standards as Math III. Students must meet the State of Tennessee requirements to receive the honors credit. Topics are covered more in-depth and as time permits additional topics are introduced for enrichment. This course is designed for the highly motivated student who plans to pursue higher-level mathematics courses.

Students will be required to take a TNReady End of Course assessment which will be factored into the student’s semester average. This course will make use the TI-84 calculator. After successful completion of this course, students are on track to take Honors Pre-Calculus. Block.

*See 12 grade math options and Prerequisites



*SENIOR and UPPER LEVEL MATH OPTIONS*

BRIDGE MATH

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00 

Articulation Available? No

Prerequisite(s): 

Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score Below (1) or Approaching (2) (most recent score available) 
  • Math 3 grade <B
  • ACT Math score <19 (most recent available; practice test can be used if no ACT score)
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: Students will take the ACT their junior year and it is essential for those who score less than a 19 in the Math section to take the Bridge Math course their senior year. Course content includes reinforcement of the topics included in Math I, II, & III.The Bridge math class will use the SAILS (Seamless Alignment and Integrated Learning Support) software system. This program introduces the college developmental math curriculum in the high school senior year. By embedding the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) Learning Support Math program in the high school Bridge Math course, students can get a head start on their college career. Students who successfully complete the program are ready to take a college math course. In SAILS, these students can complete the college Learning Support Math program, preparing them for a college-level math course, which will give them a jump-start on their college career.After successful completion of this course, students can have the opportunity to take Statistics or Applied Math. Block.


APPLIED MATH

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

Articulation Available? 

Prerequisite(s): 

Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score Approaching (2) or OnTrack (3) (most recent available used in determination)
  • Math 3 grade >C
  • ACT score >19
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: This is one of two options for a standard recommended senior level math course. Applications and modeling using mathematics are the primary foci of this course. The design of the course is to apply mathematical concepts to real world situations including topics such as counting, combinatorics, and probability, financial math, and linear programming. A strong emphasis will be placed on critical thinking skills, verbal and written communication of methods for problem solving.

This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator. Block.


STATISTICS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00 

Articulation Available? 

Prerequisite(s):
Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score Approaching (2) or OnTrack (3) (most recent available used in determination)
  • Math 3 grade >C
  • ACT score >19
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: This course is intended for those preparing for careers in business, economics, management, medical fields, or a math related field, including engineering. Course content includes experimental and theoretical probability with applications, statistical analysis involving data collection and analysis, curve fitting, and hypothesis testing. The course will involve both descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator. Block.


STATISTICS HONORS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00 

Articulation Available? 

Prerequisite(s):
Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score OnTrack (3) or Mastered (4) (most recent available used in determination)
  • Math 3 grade >B
  • ACT score >19 (most recent available; practice test can be used if no ACT score)
    • Students with ACT scores >22 should take AP Statistics
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: Statistics Honors covers the same standards as Statsitcs. Students must meet the State of Tennessee requirements to receive the honors credit. Topics are covered more in-depth and as time permits additional topics are introduced for enrichment. This course is designed for the highly motivated student who plans to pursue higher-level mathematics courses. This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator. Block.


AP STATISTICS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 12

Dual Enrollment? Yes

Course Fee: None 

Articulation Available? 

Prerequisite(s):

Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score OnTrack or Mastered (most recent available used in determination)
  • Honors Math 3 grade >B
  • ACT score ≥22 (most recent available; practice test can be used if no ACT score)
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major concepts and tool for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: Exploring Data: Describing patterns and departures from patterns, Sampling and Experimentation: Planning and conducting a study, Anticipating Patterns: Exploring random phenomena using probability and simulation, and Statistical Inference: Estimating population parameters and testing hypotheses.

Students who successfully complete the course and examination may receive credit and/or advanced placement for a one-semester introductory college statistics course. Every student enrolled is expected to participate in the AP Exam for Statistics. This course will make use of the TI-84 calculator. Block.


PRE-CALCULUS HONORS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 11-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

Articulation Available? 

Prerequisite(s): 

Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • TNReady score OnTrack (3) or Mastered (4) (most recent available used in determination)
  • Math 3 grade >B
  • ACT score >22 (most recent available; practice test can be used if no ACT score)
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: Course content includes extensive analysis of linear, exponential, and trigonometric functions, introduced to limits, vectors, and conics. Students will investigate real world applications of all types of functions and use geometric, algebraic, and numerical models of each. Students must meet the State of Tennessee requirements to receive the honors credit. This course will give a strong preparation for college level calculus.

Students develop strategies to prepare them for future advanced placement (AP) courses. Extensive technology will be used along with TI-84 Plus calculator. Block.


CALCULUS HONORS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

Articulation Available? 

Prerequisite(s): 

Students with 3 of the following should be considered for enrollment

  • ACT score >22 
  • Honors Pre-Calculus grade >B
  • Teacher recommendation

Course Description: Course content includes analytic geometry, extensive application of limits, differential and integral calculus with applications. Students will use all types of functions, calculus notation, and mathematical modeling. Projects involving rates of change, velocity, acceleration, maximum/minimum, and limits will be completed. Students will build portfolios of their work. Students must meet the State of Tennessee requirements to receive the honors credit. 

Extensive use of technology will be incorporated throughout the course. TI-84 Plus graphing calculators will be used. Students develop strategies to prepare them for future advanced placement (AP) courses. This course is only offered in the fall semester. Block.

AP CALCULUS

 

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00 

Articulation Available? 

Prerequisite(s): Completed Credit in Honors Calculus

Course Description: The Calculus AB course will be taught in 2 semesters. The first semester will be called Honors Calculus and will earn 1 credit in math. The curriculum will place a strong on application and multiple representations. Functions, graphs, limits, derivatives and applications, integrals and applications. The second semester will culminate with the AP Calculus AB exam in May.

Every student enrolled is expected to participate in the AP Exam for Calculus AB. This course will only be offered in the spring. Block.

ELA Course Offerings

2020-2021


English I

English I will focus on various genres of literature. Students will be reading and studying novels, expository texts, short stories, autobiographies, drama, and poetry. Students will be challenged and given the opportunity to grow in their practical language skills through meaningful class discussions, journal prompts, essay writing, creative projects, oral presentations, and theater arts. Students will continue to use and practice grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary skills. With an understanding of the fundamentals of literary analysis, students will be able to construct a multi-paragraph essay as well as experiment with other essay forms and modes. Students will develop critical thinking skills based on teacher modeling and will apply them to assignments independently and in cooperative learning groups.

English I Honors

English I will focus on various genres of literature. Students will be reading and studying novels, expository texts, short stories, autobiographies, drama, and poetry. Students will be challenged and given the opportunity to grow in their practical language skills through meaningful class discussions, journal prompts, essay writing, creative projects, oral presentations, and theater arts. Students will continue to use and practice grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary skills. With an understanding of the fundamentals of literary analysis, students will be able to construct a multi-paragraph essay as well as experiment with other essay forms and modes. Students will develop critical thinking skills based on teacher modeling and will apply them to assignments independently and in cooperative learning groups.  *Substantial reading and independent research is required.

English II

English II helps students make connections between the concepts they will read and write about in class and the real world. Instead of just memorizing how to do things, students will draw on their own and their classmates' experiences and knowledge to come to new and deeper understandings. When questions arise from the materials they are studying in class, students will learn how to do both quick and longer-term research to find answers. Students will have access to tools and resources that are built into the program, including powerful learning strategies, independent reading lists to help them select texts to read outside of class, and digital tools that they can access any time from any device—desktop computer, laptop, or tablet. Units of study include The Power of Argument, Persuasion in Literature, and Voice in Synthesis.



English II Honors

English II helps students make connections between the concepts they will read and write about in class and the real world. Instead of just memorizing how to do things, students will draw on their own and their classmates' experiences and knowledge to come to new and deeper understandings. When questions arise from the materials they are studying in class, students will learn how to do both quick and longer-term research to find answers. Students will have access to tools and resources that are built into the program, including powerful learning strategies, independent reading lists to help them select texts to read outside of class, and digital tools that they can access anytime from any device—desktop computer, laptop, or tablet. Units of study include The Power of Argument, Persuasion in Literature, and Voice in Synthesis.  *Substantial reading and independent research is required.




English III

English 11 will continue to build on the reading and language curriculum established in tenth grade. This course is a study of the major literary topics and themes across the history of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present day. This class will  explore compelling themes through reading, writing, discussions, performances, and research. Students will closely read short stories, novels, poems, historical texts, and articles. They will  also view and interpret films, plays, and audio texts while comparing them to their related print versions. With frequent opportunities to write creatively and analytically throughout the program, students will develop fluency, research skills, and an understanding of how to craft their writing based on audience and purpose. Through collaborative discussions, presentations, performances, and debates with their peers, students deepen their understanding of the texts they read and viewed and learn how to convey their ideas with clarity and voice.



English III Honors

English 11 will continue to build on the reading and language curriculum established in tenth grade. This course is a study of the major literary topics and themes across the history of the United States from pre-colonial times to the present day. This class will explore compelling themes through reading, writing, discussions, performances, and research. Students will closely read short stories, novels, poems, historical texts, and articles. They will also view and interpret films, plays, and audio texts while comparing them to their related print versions. With frequent opportunities to write creatively and analytically throughout the program, students will develop fluency, research skills, and an understanding of how to craft their writing based on audience and purpose. Through collaborative discussions, presentations, performances, and debates with their peers, students  deepen their  understanding of the texts they read and viewed and learn how to convey their ideas with clarity and voice. *Substantial reading and independent research is required.



ACT Preparatory Class

ACT Prep is a course that allows students to prepare for the ACT test. This class is designed for students who want to score well on their ACT test or to improve their ACT scores. The purpose of this class is to help prepare college-bound students to meet College and Career Benchmarks on their ACT test and/or to raise their ACT score to a higher level. This course is designed to support student exploration of post-secondary pathways.

Advanced Placement Language and Composition

The AP Language and Composition course incorporates American literature into the framework of the curricular requirements established by the College Board for AP English Language. In concert with the College Board’s AP Language and Composition Course Description, the reading selections and writing assignments are designed to aid “students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes.” The study of American literature lends itself well to these goals because many of the selections are nonfiction.  The American literature will be supplemented with readings from Conversations in American Literature and various anthologies of essays, as well as teacher-provided handouts. Specifically, the course will focus on close reading, rhetorical situation analysis, the writing process, various types of writing (analytic, argumentative, and synthesis in particular), critical and cultural literacy, and informed citizenry.




 


AP: Literature and Composition


This collegiate level course is designed to encourage the student to engage in creative and critical thinking in such a way that helps the students to move to a higher level of intellectual thought and design. Students will engage in thoughtful, challenging literature often found in college-level classwork.  In addition to the general environment that will promote discussion and coursework necessary for creative and critical thinking, the course will also give a “representative” foundation in the “deliberate reading and critical analysis” of British and American literature. Reading from poetry, drama, fiction, and expository prose from the sixteenth century to the present will also be examined in order to expose you to the idea of appreciation in changes in the presentation of the English language. The student will have the opportunity to delve deeper into the realm of linguistic structure by analyzing the progression, use, and impact of language as formed in a literary work. Extensive reading will provide the student with the tools to highlight and analyze the way literature has been examined and studied since the sixteenth century to the present day. Due to the shorter time of the course (one semester), the student will focus on the skills necessary to analyze, discuss, and ascertain the important pieces to the structure of the literature. The student will be able to do this through a few pieces chosen for their impact on the specific time in which they were written.




English IV

Using Springboard curriculum, this course is designed to survey world literature from a variety of genres.  The course will cover various types of grammar, composition, research, oral presentation, vocabulary building, and test taking skills.  Communication skills will be emphasized.  Preparing students for college and/or career after graduation is a priority.




English IV Honors

Using Springboard curriculum, this course involves not only reading literature and writing about it, but also learning how to analyze works from a critical viewpoint.  This is a challenging course that dares students to read, analyze, and research a wide variety of topics.  Composition skills and vocabulary should already be well developed, as they will be used extensively in this course.  *Substantial reading and independent research is required.





Dual Enrollment: Composition I


Course Overview

Writing with emphasis on the expository and argumentative essay:  Introduction to the structure and development of the essay, especially in relation to the major rhetorical strategies; Review of the basics of sentence and paragraph form, as well as grammar and punctuation rules; Coverage of argument and persuasion and the need to recognize logical fallacies; Identification of the main steps in research documentation;      Practice with critical thinking skills; Reading assignments and work due dates vary according to instructor.

Dual Enrollment:

Composition II

Course Overview

Critical and analytical writing; documented library research paper required (Prerequisite: ENGL 1010): Critical analysis of fiction, poetry, and/or drama; Literary terms to aid discussion of literary works and of the value of literary study; Review of basic essay form; Oral and written responses to literary study; Research and documentation methods.



Elective:  Creative Writing

Students will learn the elements of the creative process through arts integration and writing.  Students will study poetry, short stories, music, and writing through creating their own literary pieces which they will self-publish on the Walker Valley website and in print.  



Theater Arts I

Theater courses help students experience and develop skill in one or more aspects of theatrical production. Introductory courses provide an overview of theatrical elements including acting, set design, stage management, directing, playwriting, and production. Advanced courses concentrate on extending and refining dramatic technique, expanding students’ exposure to different types of theatrical styles, genres, and traditions, and increasing their participation in public productions. 

AGRICULTURE



Agriscience is an introductory laboratory science course that prepares students for biology, subsequent
science and agriculture courses, and postsecondary study. This course helps students understand the
important role that agricultural science and technology plays in the twenty-first century. In addition, it
serves as the first course for all programs of study in the Agriculture, Food, &amp; Natural Resources cluster.
Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for success in more advanced
agriculture and science coursework. This course counts as a lab science credit toward graduation
requirements. Prerequisite: none

Small Animal Science is an intermediate course in animal science and care for students interested in
learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific,
health, or agriculture professions. This course covers anatomy and physiological systems of different
groups of small animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry. Upon completion of
this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in veterinary and animal
science. Prerequisite: Agriscience


Large Animal Science is an applied course in veterinary and animal science for students interested in
learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific,
health, or agriculture professions. This course covers anatomy and physiological systems of different
groups of large animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry. Upon completion of
Page 2 this course, proficient students will be prepared for success in the level-four Veterinary Science
course and further postsecondary training. Prerequisite: Small Animal Science


Veterinary Science is an advanced course in animal science and care for students interested in learning
more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant, or pursuing a variety of scientific, health, or
agriculture professions. This course covers principles of health and disease, basic animal care and
nursing, clinical and laboratory procedures, and additional industry-related career and leadership
knowledge and skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to pursue advanced study of
veterinary science at a postsecondary institution. Prerequisite: Large Animal Science


Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in Agriculture is an advanced course in Agriculture, Food, and Natural
Resources career cluster intended to meet the needs of specific applications of advanced UAS precision
technologies specific to the agriculture, food, and natural resources industry. Students will receive
rigorous instruction in preparation to take the the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) remote Pilot
Certification (Part 107) (less than 55 pounds) exam for the commercial drone pilots for small Unmanned
Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and develop specific knowledge and skills associated withspecific sUAS
technologies, platforms and precision attachments to monitor, map and provide data to make
agricultural management and production recommendations. Prerequisite: Any level 2 ANFR course

 

Ag Mechanics 1:

Principles of Agricultural Mechanics is an intermediate course introducing students to basic skills and knowledge in construction and land management for both rural and urban environments. This course covers topics including project management, basic engine and motor mechanics, land surveying, irrigation and drainage, agricultural structures, and basic metalworking techniques. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in agricultural mechanics. Prerequisite: Agriscience
 
Ag Mechanics 2:
Agricultural Power and Equipment is an applied course in agricultural engineering with special emphasis on laboratory activities involving small engines, tractors, and agricultural equipment. The standards in this course address navigation, maintenance, repair, and overhaul of electrical motors, hydraulic systems, and fuel­powered engines as well as exploration of a wide range of careers in Agriculture. Prerequisite: AG Mechanics 1
 
Ag Mechanics 3:
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering is an applied course that prepares students for further study or careers in engineering, environmental science, agricultural design and research, and agricultural mechanics. Special emphasis is given to the many modern applications of geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS) to achieve various agricultural goals. Prerequisite: AG Mechanics 2
 
Greenhouse Management.:
Greenhouse Management is an applied-knowledge course designed to prepare students to manage greenhouse operations. This course covers principles of greenhouse structures, plant health and growth, growing media, greenhouse crop selection and propagation, and management techniques. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be equipped with the technical knowledge Page 2 and skills needed to prepare for further education and careers in horticulture production.
Prerequisite: AG Mechanics 1
 
Landscaping And Turf Grass:
  Landscaping and Turf Science is an applied course designed to provide challenging academic standards and relevant technical knowledge and skills needed for further education and careers in landscape design, maintenance, and turf management. Content includes site analysis and planning, principles of design, and plant selection and care techniques. Prerequisite: AG Science.
 

 

 

BUSINESS COURSES



Business Principles (Level 1)

(Introduction to Business and Marketing)

 

  • This is the first course in the Business Management, Health Services Administration, Accounting, Banking & Finance, Marketing Management, and Entrepreneurship programs of study. 

 

Course Description:

Business Principles is an introductory course designed to give students an overview of the Business Management and Administration, Marketing, and Finance career clusters. The course helps students prepare for the growing complexities of the business world by examining basic principles of business, marketing, and finance in addition to exploring key aspects of leadership, ethical and social responsibilities, and careers. Students’ academic skills in communications, mathematics, and economics are reinforced with activities modeled in the context of business topics. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be equipped with the foundational skills to succeed in any of the Business, Marketing, or Finance programs of study and will be prepared to make an informed decision regarding which pathways they would like to pursue in high school. 

Prerequisites: None

Program of Study: All



Computer Applications (Level 1)

 

Course Description:

Computer Applications is a foundational course intended to teach students the computing fundamentals and concepts involved in the use of common software applications. Upon completion of this course, students will gain basic proficiency in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentations. In addition, students will have engaged in key critical thinking skills and will have practiced ethical and appropriate behavior required for the responsible use of technology. 

Prerequisites: None

Program of Study: Office Management



Marketing and Management I: Principles (Level 2)

 

Course Description:

Marketing and Management I: Principles focuses on the study of marketing concepts and their practical applications. Students will examine the risks and challenges that marketers face to establish a competitive edge in the sale of products and services. Topics covered include foundational marketing functions such as promotion, distribution, and selling, as well as coverage of economics fundamentals, international marketing, and career development. Upon completion of Page 2 this course, proficient students will understand the economic principles, the marketing mix, and product development and selling strategies. 

Prerequisites: Introduction to Business and Marketing

Program of Study: Marketing and Entrepreneurship

 

Advertising and Public Relations (Level 3)

 

Course Description:

Advertising and Public Relations is an applied knowledge course focusing on the concepts and strategies associated with promoting products, services, ideas, and events. This course addresses skills essential to the creative side of the industry and explores consumer behavior patterns and motivations for buying. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to demonstrate understanding in fundamental advertising and public relations concepts by creating an electronic portfolio of representative course projects.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Business and Marketing and Marketing 1

Program of Study: Marketing

 

Retail Operations (Level 3/4)

 

Course Description:

Retail Operations is designed to challenge students with the real world of supply chain management and merchandising services. The standards in this course are designed to prepare students with skills and knowledge related to buying, selling, human resource management, business operations, product management, promotion, and customer service. Decision-making skills, financial management, customer relations, ethics and legal issues are also addressed. Upon completion of this applied knowledge course, proficient students will have skills essential for entering careers as retail associates at entry and mid-level management as well as be prepared to enter postsecondary programs in business and marketing. The content lends itself to both work-based learning and school-based enterprises opportunities. 

Prerequisites: Minimum of Two Business Classes (any path)

Program of Study: All

Accounting I (Level 2)

 

 

Course Description:

Accounting I introduces concepts and principles based on a double-entry system of maintaining the electronic and manual financial records for a sole proprietorship, a partnership, and corporation.  It includes analyzing business transactions, journalizing, posting and preparing worksheets and financial statements. Calculate financial ratios from the financial statements to help determine financial strengths and weaknesses of a company.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Business and Marketing

Program of Study: Accounting

 

Business Economics (Level 1)

 

Course Description:

Business Economics provides an in-depth study of fundamental concepts, free enterprise trading practices and the various players in the economic system.  Topics include the production, marketing, and distribution of goods and services, as well as roles of financial institutions, the government, and the individual within the free enterprise system. This course meets the economic requirement for graduation.

Prerequisites: None

Program of Study: None


Business Management (Level 2/3)

 

Course Description:

Business Management focuses on the development of the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling functions required for the production and delivery of goods and services. This applied knowledge course addresses the management role of utilizing the businesses’ resources of employees, equipment, and capital to achieve an organization’s goals. Students will participate in a continuing project throughout the course in which, individually or in teams, they will present recommendations to improve an existing business. Local business partnerships are encouraged to provide resources for faculty and students. Students will present final projects to business and industry. 

Prerequisites: Introduction to Business and Marketing, and Accounting 1 OR Computer Applications

Program of Study: Business Management, and Office Management


Event Planning (Level 3)

 

Course Description:

Event Planning & Management is designed to be a project-based, capstone experience in which students’ research, prepare, deliver, and reflect upon an original event for a community organization, business, or non-profit. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will further refine leadership, teamwork, and management skills acquired in previous courses and apply them through application in a practicum setting. The course is highly customizable to meet local needs: partner organizations may be chosen at the discretion of student teams, with the approval of the instructor and appropriate school personnel. Organizations can include local nonprofits, charities, shelters, agencies, businesses, sports teams, school-based enterprises, or other entities with a demonstrated need for assistance in staging an event or a commitment to providing students with work-based learning opportunities.

Prerequisites: Introduction to Business and Marketing, and Marketing 1

Program of Study: Marketing

Entrepreneurship (Level 3)

 

Course Description:

Business & Entrepreneurship Practicum is a capstone course intended to provide students with the opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous Business and Marketing courses within a simulated startup environment or authentic business setting. The course is structured to allow students the creativity to develop, launch, and market original business ideas. It is ideal for students who wish to pursue careers as future business owners or entrepreneurs. Practicum activities can take place around student-led startups under the supervision of the instructor, or in collaboration with a local business incubator. The standards in this course can also be used to promote student participation in a work-based learning (WBL) experience through an internship or other off-campus arrangement. Upon completion of the practicum, proficient students will be prepared to further develop their business ideas into viable ventures, or continue their study at the postsecondary level. 

Prerequisites: Introduction to Business and Marketing, and Marketing 1

Program of Study: Entrepreneurship

 

 

 

Criminal Justice



Criminal Justice 1: Criminal Justice I is the first course in the Criminal Justice and Correction Services program of study. It serves as a comprehensive survey of how the law enforcement, legal, and correctional systems interact with each other in the United States. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will understand the context of local, state, and federal laws, the concepts of crime control and the judicial process, and the importance of communications and professionalism in law enforcement.

 

Criminal Justice 2: Criminal Justice II is the second course in the Criminal Justice and Correctional Services program of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will understand the impact of the constitution on law enforcement, law enforcement and police procedures, alcohol and beverage laws, sentencing, and the importance of communications and professionalism in law enforcement.


Criminal Justice 3 Forensic Criminal Investigations: Forensic Criminal Investigations is the third course designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to be successful in the sciences of criminal investigations. Students will learn terminology and investigation skills related to the crime scene, aspects of criminal behavior, and applications of the scientific inquiry to solve crimes. By utilizing the scientific inquiry method, students will obtain and analyze evidence through simulated crime scenes and evaluation of case studies. Upon Primary Career Cluster: Law, Public Safety, Corrections, & Security Course Contact: Standards@tn.gov Course Code(s): C30H02 Prerequisite(s): Criminal Justice I (C30H00) and Criminal Justice II (C30H01) Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11-12 Focused Elective Graduation Requirements: This course satisfies one of three credits required for an elective focus when taken in conjunction with other Law, Public Safety, Corrections, and Security courses. POS Concentrator: This course satisfies one out of two required courses to meet the Perkins V concentrator definition, when taken in sequence in the approved program of study. Programs of Study and Sequence: This is the third course in the Criminal Justice and Correctional Services program of study. Aligned Student Organization(s): SkillsUSA: https://www.skillsusatn.org/ Coordinating WorkBased Learning: Teachers are encouraged to use embedded WBL activities such as informational interviewing, job shadowing, and career mentoring. For information, visit https://www.tn.gov/education/career-and-technicaleducation/work-based-learning.html Available Student Industry Certifications: None Teacher Endorsement(s): 590, 750 Required Teacher Certifications/Training: None Teacher Resources: https://www.tn.gov/education/career-and-technical-education/careerclusters/cte-cluster-law-public-safety.html Page 2 completion of this course, proficient students will be able to identify careers forensic science and criminology, summarize the laws that govern the application of forensic science, and draw key connections between the history of the forensic science system and the modern legal system.

 

Health Science

Health Science:

Health Science Education is an introductory course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of public health, therapeutics, health services administration, diagnostics, and support services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in these fields, compare and contrast the features of healthcare systems, explain the legal and ethical ramifications of the healthcare setting, and begin to perform foundational healthcare skills. This course will serve as a strong foundation for all of the Health Science programs of study as well as the Health Services Administration program of study.

 

Medical Therapeutics

Medical Therapeutics is an applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in therapeutic and nursing services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in therapeutics services; assess, monitor, evaluate, and report patient/client health status; and identify the purpose and components of treatments.
 
Prerequisite: Health Science

 

 Rehabilitative Careers:

Rehabilitation Careers is an applied course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in rehabilitation services. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to identify careers in rehabilitation services, recognize diseases, disorders or injuries related to rehabilitation services and correlate the related anatomy and physiology then develop a plan of treatment with appropriate modalities.

 

Prerequisite: Health Science

 

Emergency Medical Services:

Emergency Medical Services is a capstone course in the Emergency Medical Services program of study and is designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the fields of emergency medicine. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to: identify careers and features of the EMS system; define the importance of workforce safety and wellness; maintain legal and ethical guidelines; correlate anatomy and physiology concepts to the patient with a medical or traumatic injury; and perform EMS skills with a high level of proficiency. If taught with an EMT instructor, students will be given the opportunity to sit for the National Emergency Medical Responder certification.  Each standard presumes that the expected knowledge and behaviors are within the scope of practice for that EMS licensure level, as defined by the National EMS Scope of Practice Model. Each competency applies to patients of all ages, unless a specific age group is identified. The standards also presume there is a progression in practice from the Emergency Medical Responder level to the Paramedic level. The descriptors used to illustrate the increasing complexity of knowledge and behaviors through the progression of licensure levels originate, in part, from the National EMS Scope of Practice Model. 

 

Prerequisite: Health Science and Medical Therapeutics

 

Medical Assisting
Medical Assisting is designed to prepare students to pursue careers in medical assisting. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to implement communication and interpersonal skills, provide care safely, prevent emergency situations, prevent infection through infection control, and perform the skills required of a medical assistant. At the conclusion of this course and an appropriate clinical internship, students may sit for the Certified Clinical Medical
Assistant (CCMA) exam.

 

Prerequisite: Health Science and Medical Therapeutics

 

Nursing Education
 Nursing Education is a capstone course designed to prepare students to pursue careers in the field of nursing. Upon completion of this course, a proficient student will be able to implement communication and interpersonal skills, maintain residents’ rights and independence, provide care safely, prevent emergency situations, prevent infection through infection control, and perform the skills required of a nursing assistant. At the conclusion of this course students will be eligible to take the certification examination as a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). Students are required to fill out an application to be considered for this course.

Prerequisites: Health Science and Medical Therapeutics.

Clinical Internship
Clinical Internship is a capstone course and work-based learning experience designed to provide students with real-world application of skills and knowledge obtained in a pre-requisite Health Science course. Prior to beginning work at a clinical site, students must be certified in Basic Life Support (BLS) Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), and deemed competent in basic first aid, body mechanics, Standard Precaution guidelines, and confidentiality. Students are required to fill out an application to be considered for this course.

There are prerequisites for this course.

 

Mechatronics

Principles of Manufacturing  

Principles of Manufacturing is designed to provide students with exposure to various occupations and pathways in the Advanced Manufacturing career cluster, such as Machining Technology, Electromechanical Technology, Mechatronics, and Welding. In order to gain a holistic view of the advanced manufacturing industry, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two focus areas. Throughout the course, they will develop an understanding of the general steps involved in the manufacturing process and master the essential skills to be an effective team member in a manufacturing production setting. Course content covers basic quality principles and processes, blueprints and schematics, and systems. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will advance from this course with a nuanced understanding of how manufacturing combines design and engineering, materials science, process technology, and quality. Upon completion of the Principles of Manufacturing course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision regarding which Advanced Manufacturing program of study to pursue. 



Digital Electronics 

Digital Electronics is intended to provide students with an introduction to the basic components of digital electronic systems and equip them with the ability to use these components to design more complex digital systems. Proficient students will be able to (1) describe basic functions of digital components (including gates, flip flops, counters, and other devices upon which larger systems are designed), (2) use these devices as building blocks to design larger, more complex circuits, (3) implement these circuits using programmable devices, and (4) effectively communicate designs and systems. Students develop additional skill in technical documentation when operating and troubleshooting circuits. Upon completion of the Digital Electronics course, proficient students will be able to design a complex digital system and communicate their designs through a variety of media. 



Mechatronics 1 

 

Mechatronics I is an applied course in the manufacturing cluster for students interested in learning more about careers as a mechatronics technician, maintenance technician, electromechanical technician, and manufacturing engineer. This first of two courses covers basic electrical and mechanical components of mechatronics systems as well as their combined uses with instrument controls and embedded software designs. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to describe and explain basic functions of physical properties and electrical components within a mechatronic system. They can logically trace the flow of energy through a mechatronic system and can communicate this process to others. They know how to effectively use technical documentation such as data sheets, schematics, timing diagrams, and system specifications to troubleshoot basic problems with equipment. Finally, they develop strategies to identify, localize, and correct malfunctioning components and equipment.

 

Prerequisite:  Principles of Manufacturing or Digital Electronics

 

Mechatronics II

Mechatronics II is an advanced course in the manufacturing career cluster for students interested in learning more about such careers as mechatronics technician, maintenance technician, or electromechanical technician. Following the groundwork of mechanics and electronics laid in Mechatronics I, this course covers basics of pneumatic, electro pneumatic, and hydraulic control circuits in a complex mechatronic system. In addition, the course addresses basic digital logic and  programmable logic controllers (PLCs) employed in the mechanical, electronic, and control systems in a mechatronics system. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to explain the inter-relationships of components and modules within a complex mechatronic system. They understand the differences between hydraulic and pneumatic fluid power and can explain the scientific principles that apply. They also use technical documentation (such as datasheets, circuit diagrams, displacement step diagrams, timing diagrams, and function charts) to troubleshoot and resolve malfunctioning pneumatic and hydraulic components and circuits. They demonstrate understanding of the role of programmable logic controllers (PLC) in mechatronic systems and the ability to write, debug, and run basic ladder logic.

 

Prerequisite: Mechatronics I

 

DE Mechatronics

DE Mechatronics is an advanced course offered by Cleveland State Community College that is taught on the Walker Valley Campus.

 

 

 

Engineering



Principles of Engineering and Technology:

 

Principles of Engineering and Technology is a foundational course in the Engineering cluster for students interested in learning more about careers in engineering and technology. This course covers basic skills required for engineering and technology fields of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to identify and explain the steps in the engineering design process. They can evaluate an existing engineering design, use fundamental sketching and engineering drawing techniques, complete simple design projects using the engineering design process, and effectively communicate design solutions to others.  

 

Prerequisite : None



Engineering Design I:

 

Engineering Design I is a fundamental course in the Engineering cluster for students interested in developing their skills in preparation for careers in engineering and technology. The course covers essential knowledge, skills, and concepts required for postsecondary engineering and technology fields of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to describe various engineering disciplines, as well as admissions requirements for postsecondary engineering and engineering technology programs in Tennessee. They will also be able to identify simple and complex machines; calculate various ratios related to mechanisms; explain fundamental concepts related to energy; understand Ohm’s Law; follow the steps in the engineering design process to complete a team project; and effectively communicate design solutions to others. 

 

This is the second course in the Engineering program of study.

 

Prerequisite : Principles of Engineering and Technology, Algebra I, Physical Science



Engineering Design II:

 

Engineering Design II is an applied course in the Engineering career cluster for students interested in further developing their skills as future engineers. This course covers knowledge, skills, and concepts required for postsecondary engineering and technology fields of study. Upon completion of this course, proficient students are able to explain the differences between scientists and engineers, understand the importance of ethical practices in engineering and technology, identify components of control systems, describe differences between laws related to fluid power systems, explain why material and mechanical properties are important to design, create simple free body diagrams, use measurement devices employed in engineering, conduct basic engineering economic analysis, follow the steps in the engineering design process to complete a team project, and effectively communicate design solutions to others. Note: Students are expected to use engineering notebooks to document procedures, design ideas, and other notes for all projects throughout the course. 

 

This is the third course in the Engineering program of study.

 

Prerequisite : Engineering Design I, Biology or Chemistry

 

 

  

NETWORKING/ CODING
 
Computer Science Foundations (CSF)
Computer Science Foundations (CSF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various
information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Coding, Web Design
and Cybersecurity. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of
four focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various
information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to
demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in
the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an
understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client
relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web
publication. Upon completion of the CSF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision
about which Information Technology program of study to pursue.
 
Computer Systems
Computer Systems is an intermediate course designed to prepare students with work-related skills and
aligned certification in the information technology industry. Content provides students the opportunity
to acquire knowledge in both theory and practical applications pertaining to hardware, operating
systems, safe mode, command prompt, security, networking, printers, peripheral devices, laptops,
mobile devices, troubleshooting, and customer service management. Upon completion of the course,
proficient students will have acquired skills and knowledge to install, configure, and maintain computer
systems. Students who are proficient in this course will be eligible to pursue the IT industry-standard
credential, CompTIA’s A+ certification.
 
Prerequisite(s): Computer Science Foundations (C10H11), Algebra I (G02X02, G02H00)
 
Networking
Networking is an advanced course designed to emphasize the conceptual and practical skills necessary
to design, manage, and diagnose network hardware and software. Upon completion of this course,
proficient students will identify types of networks, understand the layers of the open systems
interconnection (OSI) model, prevent security risks, and apply troubleshooting theory to the successful
execution of networking tasks. Course content covers transmission control protocol, internet protocol,
wired and wireless topologies, switching and routing, network hardware, wireless networking, and
network operating systems (NOS). Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared
to sit for the CompTIA Network+ exam.

Prerequisite(s): Computer Systems (C10H10), Algebra I(G02X02, G02H00)
 
 
CODING I
Coding I is a course intended to teach students the basics of computer programming. The course places
emphasis on practicing standard programming techniques and learning the logic tools and methods
typically used by programmers to create simple computer applications. Upon completion of this course,
proficient students will be able to solve problems by planning multistep procedures; write, analyze,
review, and revise programs, converting detailed information from workflow charts and diagrams into
coded instructions in a computer language; and will be able to troubleshoot/debug programs and
software applications to correct malfunctions and ensure their proper execution.

Prerequisite(s):Algebra I (G02X02, G02H00), Computer Science Foundations (C10H11)
 
CODING II
Coding II challenges students to develop advanced skills in problem analysis, construction of algorithms,
and computer implementation of algorithms as they work on programming projects of increased
complexity. In so doing, they develop key skills of discernment and judgment as they must choose from
among many languages, development environments, and strategies for the program life cycle. Course
content is reinforced through numerous short- and long-term programming projects, accomplished both
individually and in small groups. These projects are meant to hone the discipline and logical thinking
skills necessary to craft error-free syntax for the writing and testing of programs. Upon completion of
this course, proficient students will demonstrate an understanding of object-oriented programming
language using high-level languages such as FOCUS, Python, or SAS.
 
Prerequisite(s): Coding I (C10H14)omputer Science Foundations (CSF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various
information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Coding, Web Design
and Cybersecurity. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of
four focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various
information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to
demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in
the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an
understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client
relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web
publication. Upon completion of the CSF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision
about which Information Technology program of study to pursue.
Computer Systems is an intermediate course designed to prepare students with work-related skills and
aligned certification in the information technology industry. Content provides students the opportunity
to acquire knowledge in both theory and practical applications pertaining to hardware, operating
systems, safe mode, command prompt, security, networking, printers, peripheral devices, laptops,
mobile devices, troubleshooting, and customer service management. Upon completion of the course,
proficient students will have acquired skills and knowledge to install, configure, and maintain computer
systems. Students who are proficient in this course will be eligible to pursue the IT industry-standard
credential, CompTIA’s A+ certification. Prerequisite(s): Computer Science Foundations (C10H11),
Algebra I (G02X02, G02H00)
Networking is an advanced course designed to emphasize the conceptual and practical skills necessary
to design, manage, and diagnose network hardware and software. Upon completion of this course,
proficient students will identify types of networks, understand the layers of the open systems
interconnection (OSI) model, prevent security risks, and apply troubleshooting theory to the successful
execution of networking tasks. Course content covers transmission control protocol, internet protocol,
wired and wireless topologies, switching and routing, network hardware, wireless networking, and
network operating systems (NOS). Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared
to sit for the CompTIA Network+ exam. Prerequisite(s): Computer Systems (C10H10), Algebra I
(G02X02, G02H00)
 
 
 
CODING
Computer Science Foundations (CSF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various
information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Coding, Web Design
and Cybersecurity. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of
four focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various
information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to
demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in
the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an
understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client
relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web
publication. Upon completion of the CSF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision
about which Information Technology program of study to pursue.
Coding I is a course intended to teach students the basics of computer programming. The course places
emphasis on practicing standard programming techniques and learning the logic tools and methods
typically used by programmers to create simple computer applications. Upon completion of this course,
proficient students will be able to solve problems by planning multistep procedures; write, analyze,
review, and revise programs, converting detailed information from workflow charts and diagrams into
coded instructions in a computer language; and will be able to troubleshoot/debug programs and
software applications to correct malfunctions and ensure their proper execution. Prerequisite(s):
Algebra I (G02X02, G02H00), Computer Science Foundations (C10H11)
Coding II challenges students to develop advanced skills in problem analysis, construction of algorithms,
and computer implementation of algorithms as they work on programming projects of increased
complexity. In so doing, they develop key skills of discernment and judgment as they must choose from
among many languages, development environments, and strategies for the program life cycle. Course
content is reinforced through numerous short- and long-term programming projects, accomplished both
individually and in small groups. These projects are meant to hone the discipline and logical thinking
skills necessary to craft error-free syntax for the writing and testing of programs. Upon completion of
this course, proficient students will demonstrate an understanding of object-oriented programming
language using high-level languages such as FOCUS, Python, or SAS. Prerequisite(s): Coding I (C10

 

Computer Science Foundations (CSF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various
information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Coding, Web Design
and Cybersecurity. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of
four focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various
information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to
demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in
the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an
understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client
relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web
publication. Upon completion of the CSF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision
about which Information Technology program of study to pursue.
Computer Systems is an intermediate course designed to prepare students with work-related skills and
aligned certification in the information technology industry. Content provides students the opportunity
to acquire knowledge in both theory and practical applications pertaining to hardware, operating
systems, safe mode, command prompt, security, networking, printers, peripheral devices, laptops,
mobile devices, troubleshooting, and customer service management. Upon completion of the course,
proficient students will have acquired skills and knowledge to install, configure, and maintain computer
systems. Students who are proficient in this course will be eligible to pursue the IT industry-standard
credential, CompTIA’s A+ certification. Prerequisite(s): Computer Science Foundations (C10H11),
Algebra I (G02X02, G02H00)
Networking is an advanced course designed to emphasize the conceptual and practical skills necessary
to design, manage, and diagnose network hardware and software. Upon completion of this course,
proficient students will identify types of networks, understand the layers of the open systems
interconnection (OSI) model, prevent security risks, and apply troubleshooting theory to the successful
execution of networking tasks. Course content covers transmission control protocol, internet protocol,
wired and wireless topologies, switching and routing, network hardware, wireless networking, and
network operating systems (NOS). Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be prepared
to sit for the CompTIA Network+ exam. Prerequisite(s): Computer Systems (C10H10), Algebra I
(G02X02, G02H00)
 
 
 
CODING
Computer Science Foundations (CSF) is a course intended to provide students with exposure to various
information technology occupations and pathways such as Networking Systems, Coding, Web Design
and Cybersecurity. As a result, students will complete all core standards, as well as standards in two of
four focus areas. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to describe various
information technology (IT) occupations and professional organizations. Moreover, they will be able to
demonstrate logical thought processes and discuss the social, legal, and ethical issues encountered in
the IT profession. Depending on the focus area, proficient students will also demonstrate an
understanding of electronics and basic digital theory; project management and teamwork; client
relations; causes and prevention of Internet security breaches; and writing styles appropriate for web
publication. Upon completion of the CSF course, students will be prepared to make an informed decision
about which Information Technology program of study to pursue.
Coding I is a course intended to teach students the basics of computer programming. The course places
emphasis on practicing standard programming techniques and learning the logic tools and methods
typically used by programmers to create simple computer applications. Upon completion of this course,
proficient students will be able to solve problems by planning multistep procedures; write, analyze,
review, and revise programs, converting detailed information from workflow charts and diagrams into
coded instructions in a computer language; and will be able to troubleshoot/debug programs and
software applications to correct malfunctions and ensure their proper execution. Prerequisite(s):
Algebra I (G02X02, G02H00), Computer Science Foundations (C10H11)
Coding II challenges students to develop advanced skills in problem analysis, construction of algorithms,
and computer implementation of algorithms as they work on programming projects of increased
complexity. In so doing, they develop key skills of discernment and judgment as they must choose from
among many languages, development environments, and strategies for the program life cycle. Course
content is reinforced through numerous short- and long-term programming projects, accomplished both
individually and in small groups. These projects are meant to hone the discipline and logical thinking
skills necessary to craft error-free syntax for the writing and testing of programs. Upon completion of
this course, proficient students will demonstrate an understanding of object-oriented programming
language using high-level languages such as FOCUS, Python, or SAS. Prerequisite(s): Coding I (C10H

World Language Department

All world language courses use methods and strategies that are based on research in language acquisition. We use these best practices to integrate culture and authentic resources in order to improve listening, reading, writing and speaking. Grammar is embedded in and taught through level-appropriate materials. Courses are aligned with Tennessee State Standards.

LEVEL

PERFORMANCE TARGET

1

Novice High 

2

Intermediate Low

3

Intermediate Mid

4

Intermediate Mid

5

Intermediate High

https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/stateboardofeducation/documents/10-20-17_III_A_World_Language_Standards_Attachment_Clean_Copy.pdf

Spanish I

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00

 

Course Description: The first year course is designed to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the target language and an appreciation of Hispanic culture.  Block.

 Spanish II

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00

 

Course Description: The second year course is designed to strengthen and enlarge the basic skills begun in the first year and to permit the student to begin to apply these in a more abstract manner.  Emphasis is placed on increasing accuracy and ability in use of the language through activities such as readers, laboratory studies, and writing exercises. Block.

 Spanish III

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? Yes

Grade(s): 10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00

 

Course Description: The study of the language at this level is a continuation of the language skills learned in Spanish I and Spanish II.  Major grammar points are completed and others reviewed.  Emphasis is placed on listening and comprehension.  Block.

 Spanish IV

Credit(s):  1                            

Honors Credit?:  Yes

Grade(s):  10-12

Dual Enrollment?:  No

Course Fee:  $5.00

 

Course Description:  The course further emphasizes the development of the four language skills:  listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness.  A literacy novel will be introduced in the target language.  Block.

 French I

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00

 

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce French pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar so that the student becomes relatively competent in speaking, comprehending and reading French.  French culture and geography are introduced through supplementary readings in French.  Block.

 French II

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00

 

Course Description: This course is designed to improve and augment skills gained in French I.  This includes the following:  review of basic grammar with the addition of complex grammar, vocabulary study, pronunciation and comprehension.  Students experience immersion into the French language, culture and life styles through hands-on projects. Block.

 French III

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit?  Yes

Grade(s):  10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

 

Course Description:  The study of the language at this level is a continuation of the language skills in French I and French II.  Highlights include major grammar points, reading of at least one novel, creating current-issue projects, and continued immersion into the language through oral practice.


 French IV

Credit(s):  1                            

Honors Credit?:  Yes

Grade(s):  10-12

Dual Enrollment?:  No

Course Fee:  $5.00

 
 

Course Description:  The course further emphasizes the development of the four language skills:  listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness.  A literacy novel will be introduced in the target language.  Block.

 German I

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00

 

Course Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce German pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar so that the student becomes relatively competent in speaking, comprehending, and reading German.  German culture and geography are introduced through supplementary readings in German.  Block.

 German II

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit? No

Grade(s): 10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee: $5.00

 

Course Description: This course is designed to improve and augment skills gained in German I.  This includes the following:  review of basic grammar with the addition of complex grammar, vocabulary study, pronunciation, and comprehension.  Students immersion into the German language and cultural life styles through hands-on projects.  Block.

 German III

Credit(s): 1

Honors Credit?  Yes

Grade(s):  10-12

Dual Enrollment? No

Course Fee:  $5.00

 

Course Description:  The study of the language at this level is a continuation of the language skills in German I and German II.  Highlights include major grammar points, reading of at least one novel, creating current-issue projects, and continued immersion into the language through oral practice.


 German IV

Credit(s):  1                            

Honors Credit?:  Yes

Grade(s):  10-12

Dual Enrollment?:  No

Course Fee:  $5.00

 
 

Course Description:  The course further emphasizes the development of the four language skills:  listening, speaking, reading and writing with stress on communicative competence and cultural awareness.  A literacy novel will be introduced in the target language.  Block.


All level V courses (not listed below) are taught by a College Board© trained AP teacher. These classes are designed to prepare the students to take the Advanced Placement (AP) test for German Language and Culture or Spanish Language and Culture or French Language and Culture. The syllabi for these courses are theme-based as well as aligned with College Board© standards. Please ask the individual teacher for a syllabus. 

Walker Valley High School offers the Seal of Biliteracy. The Seal of Biliteracy is an award given in recognition of students who have studied and attained proficiency (Intermediate High/Advanced Low in Spanish, French or German) in two or more languages by high school graduation. Visit this link to learn more https://www.volstateseal.org/
 
 
To view presentation of Walker Valley's Biliteracy Program, click here